Category: Events

Artists and Their Books / Books and Their Artists

GETTY CENTER
Daily, through October 28
Research Institute Galleries I and II

Artists’ books occupy a creative space between traditional books and contemporary works of art, challenging what a book can be. This highly visual and experiential presentation of some of the most lively and surprising works from the Research Institute’s extensive collections focuses on artists’ books that can be unpacked, unfolded, unfurled, or disassembled. They are made to be displayed on the wall or deployed as sculptures or installations. The exhibition seeks to provoke new inquiry into the nature of art and to highlight the essential role that books play in contemporary culture.

For additional information, please visit The Getty Center website.

New Territory: Landscape Photography Today
Daily, through September 16
Hamilton Building – Level 2

The exhibition is a survey of contemporary landscape photography from around the world. The exhibition of more than 100 photographs will explore how artists stretch the boundaries of traditional landscape photography to reflect the environmental attitudes, perceptions, and values of our time.

The works revive historic photographic processes as well as use innovative techniques and unconventional equipment and chemistry to depict landscapes in surprising ways. Taken individually and as a whole, the photographs will show how about 40 artists have manipulated materials and processes for expressive purposes, blurring the distinction between “observed” and “constructed” imagery. The exhibition challenges us to see photography differently, and contemplate our complex relationship with the landscape.

For additional information, please visit the Denver Art Museum website.

Christopher RussellChristopher Russell’s Landscape series was recently acquired by Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art, Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, California Museum of Photography, and One National Gay and Lesbian Archives. Works from this series are also currently on view in the exhibition Way Bay at the Berkeley Art Museum Pacific Film Archive, curated by Lawrence Rinder.

Additionally, Christopher Russell is included in the exhibition Cut! Paper Play in Contemporary Photography at the Getty Center. The exhibition features works by Thomas Demand, Christiane Feser, Daniel Gordon, Soo Kim, Matt Lipps, and Christopher Russell and is on view February 27–May 27, 2018.

Justin Favela is featured in Pachucos y Sirenas at Museo de las Americas. Pachucos y Sirenas includes works by Justin Favela, Antonia Fernandez, Carlos Fresquez, Josiah Lopez, Jerry Vigil, and Daniel Salazar and highlights the impact that the 1940’s Pachuco legacy has had on the American experience. Artist talk on February 9th, from 6-8pm. On view through May 26, 2018.

TF, SM at U of A

Sarah McKenzie and Tobias Fike are included in the exhibition, Elsewhere, a group exhibition co-curated with Brooke Grucella and Martina Shenal, at University of Arizona’s Joseph Gross Gallery. The exhibition features Kevin Cooley, Noemie Goudal, Nazafarin Lofti, Dario Robleto, and Chris Thorson. On view through March 23, 2018.

Don Stinson, Curtis

Don Stinson to be included in group exhibition, Open Space – The Finite Frontier, on view at The Curtis Center for the Arts, January 6 – February 28, 2018. Click here for more information.

Don Stinson, What Lies Between, a new catalogue featuring works from Don Stinson’s recent solo exhibition at David B. Smith Gallery is now available. Featuring a foreword written by Karen McWhorter, Scarlett Curator of Western American Art, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, and catalogue essay by Amy Scott, Chief Curator and Marilyn B. and Calvin B. Gross Curator of Visual Arts at the Autry Museum of the American West. Click here to purchase your copy.

Black Cube, Personal Structures

Personal Structures
Joel Swanson and Laura Shill
On the occasion of the 57th Venice Biennale

Palazzo Bembo, located off the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy
Presented by Black Cube Nomadic Museum.
Saturday, May 13th – Sunday, November 26th, 2017
Free and open to the public.

David B. Smith Gallery is proud to support artist Joel Swanson in a two person exhibition, Personal Structures, in Venice, Italy, occurring concurrently with the 2017 Venice Biennale. Presented by Black Cube Nomadic Museum and curated by Cortney Lane Stell, Swanson is exhibiting alongside Denver artist Laura Shill, as the two examine the concepts and cultural uptake of gender and language. Personal Structures, located in the historic Palazzo Bembo, recently called “a nimble counterpoint to the more top-heavy parts of Venice’s Biennale” in an article by Terence Trouillout for artnet, marks the debut of Colorado artists in Venice for this renown cultural event.

Read the full article here.

Have you ever been writing a word and for a brief moment it looks strange? It seems to almost lose its meaning? This happens to me when I write the word “what.” I stare at the word, sound it out, but it just seems foreign. Technically, this phenomenon is known as aphasia, the condition when someone loses the ability to understand language, typically due to some type of brain trauma. There is something so vulnerable and terrifying about losing our primary mode of communication, but it also allows us to see and experience the world without this wrapper of words and language. This is what Paul Valery means when he says, “To see is to forget the name of the thing one sees.” Perhaps my work might induce a brief (and non-violent) moment of aphasia in its viewers; that it might offer a fleeting but significant experience where we see through, or perhaps beyond language, and help us experience the world in a different way.   – Joel Swanson, from interview with Stephanie Edwards.

Read the full interview here

Megan Gafford pop-up

One night pop-up exhibition and reception
Friday, April 28, from 7 – 9pm
Free and open to the public / Artist in attendance

David B. Smith Gallery is proud to present its first one night pop-up exhibition with Denver artist Megan Gafford, titled Traces. In the entirety of the main gallery are two separate yet conceptually intertwined installation works, Hormesis and Subatomic Chorus.

Hormesis, the title of one of the pieces, is also the name of the hypothesis that asserts that low doses of radiation are healthy. This is a controversial theory, as some scientists believe that any amount of exposure has the potential to cause serious genetic harm. Hormesis exposes viewers to low doses of gamma radiation emitted from live uranium ore, enabling one to observe the imperceptible.  Included in the installation is a particle detector housing uranium, where the rock’s radioactive decay creates visible condensation trails in an alcohol cloud; making visible the history of each particle’s path through space and time.  Along with the machine, a video projection of the phenomenon magnified offers an intimate view of the subatomic world.

Also featured in Traces is Subatomic Chorus, an ominous grouping of five handmade Geiger counters that chirp every time they detect background radiation, as if singing together in a choir. These machines are sensitive enough to detect low-level radiation that is constantly present in the environment, which originates from outer space, uranium in the earth, and the residual radiation from nuclear bombs. Subatomic Chorus draws attention to the invisible, subatomic world that impacts our DNA in ways in which are not fully comprehended by modern theory and technology at this time. Scientists are still debating whether low-level radiation is helpful or harmful. Subatomic Chorus compels viewers to confront the unknown.

Through the introduction and exposure to the world of subatomic processes constantly occurring inside and around us, Gafford renders the fantastic intelligible. Acting as opposing yet harmonious forces in Traces, Hormesis and Subatomic Chorus actively create and monitor radioactive events, drawing attention to the uncharted space between scientific theory, proven fact, and enigma.

Adam Milner: Remains, November 2, 2016 through January 15, 2017

The Warhol presents the seventh iteration of the Exposures series: Remains by Adam Milner. Remains, a new work made expressly for The Warhol, presents an installation of fragmented bodies made up of casts, mementos, and detritus from our everyday lives. Working within a social and performance practice, Milner creates collections and archives that blur boundaries between private and public, the intimate and detached. This Exposures project is incorporated in the museum galleries, and Milner excavates both his personal life as well as the museum archives collection to assemble site-specific works that reveal a deep desire to understand where a body begins and ends, who has control of it, and how we can better empathize with non-human bodies. Comprised of numerous small objects—a wisdom tooth from an ex-boyfriend cast in silver, objects from Andy Warhol’s personal archive and life, fingernails from a stranger—the artifacts add up to bodies, in the way an archaeologist might reconstruct a figure with excavated bones and fossils. Milner’s work, while deeply personal, ultimately deals with broader notions of exchange and desire. His installation is exhibited on the 3rd floor near the museum archives collection and Time Capsules.

Artist Video via The Glassblock:

In conjunction with his exhibition at The Andy Warhol Museum, Remains, Adam Milner was recently profiled by The Glassblock. This artist talk not only highlighted his most recent exhibition and the act of choosing mementos from his and Andy Warhol’s lives for this exhibition, but also delved more deeply into his artistic practice and process of collecting. The article and video of his talk can be found here.

Milner on The Warhol Blog:

Milner was also invited to contribute to The Warhol Blog. In his entry, Milner recalls his process of selection and personal connections to the archival artifacts included in Remains. Full blog post can be read here.

Artist Talk, Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 2pm

Exposures artist Adam Milner discusses his installation Remains with Jessica Beck, The Warhol’s associate curator of art. Milner’s installation juxtaposes found mementos and detritus from our daily lives alongside unusual objects mined from the permanent collection. Displayed in archival vitrines, Milner’s work highlights the seemingly arbitrary nature of Warhol’s collecting habits and the challenges and failures of the archive to accurately represent the life of the artist. Milner discusses the development of his practice and his work in various media including paintings, drawings, and archival installations. Remains is on view on the museum’s third floor near the archives collection from November 2, 2016 – January 15, 2017.