Category: Press

5280 Home Magazine, David B. Smith Gallery
5280 Home magazine featured the gallery in a feature called “How to Buy Art” in their Spring 2014 issue, which included advice from Denver-based art dealers and consultants.

Research galleries at industry sites such as the Denver Art Dealers Asociation, suggests David Smith, owner and director of the David B. Smith Gallery (pictured). Although the prices aren’t listed online, you’ll get a feel for which galleries’ aesthetics align with yours. Then start visiting your favorites. And don’t get intimidated. Smith says: “This is Denver, and pretty much every gallery here is totally accessible.”

Don Stinson, The Road to Valentine, Exhibition catalogue
Exhibition catalogue for Don Stinson at the David B. Smith Gallery
October 25 – November 23, 2013

Don Stinson: The Road to Valentine
Softcover, 10 x 7 1/4 inches, 62 pages, 27 color images

Foreword: Jerry Smith, Curator of American and Western Art, Phoenix Art Museum
Essay: Karen E. Brooks, Historian, Department Assistant of the Petrie Institute of Western American Art at the Denver Art Museum

Printed and bound in the United States
Published by David B. Smith Gallery, 2013
978-0-9857418-3-9
$30

To order, please visit our online store.

Don Stinson review, Denver Westword


Michael Paglia
November 7, 2013

Stinson is probably best known for his diptych at the Denver Art Museum titled “The Necessity of Ruins.” Though the piece is not currently on display, it’s familiar to many, since it’s a popular attraction of the Western collection. “Ruins” is a depiction of an abandoned drive-in movie theater; the scene is anchored by a weathered movie screen in one panel and by the natural landscape in the other, and the two paintings have been tied together with a drive-in speaker stand. In this piece, Stinson lays out the key to his chief interest: exploring the way society has intruded on nature.

Most of the paintings in this show were done in the last year or two and are set in Colorado, Utah or New Mexico; nearly all of them include buildings or other structures as significant elements. When I ran into Stinson at the gallery, he remarked that everything was set in the morning — shortly before, during, or immediately after sunrise. He also noted how important it was for him to be part of a longstanding tradition — the landscape — in regional art, saying that it helps to define what’s special about an artist living in this part of the country. It was Stinson who remarked during a panel discussion in 2007 that the Rockies were a celebrity landscape — and he’s right. And it was our scenery that created a nascent art world in this part of the country more than a century ago, even if the landscape is now just one of many approaches being taken by artists around here.

Stinson’s technique in oil on linen seems to come out of the classic realist tradition, with the paint applied smoothly and brushmarks kept to a minimum. Though he’s best known for his depictions of rural ruins, Stinson also does renderings of other artworks. The first of two in this show is a view of the famous “Spiral Jetty,” by Robert Smithson, that juts into the Great Salt Lake. In the Stinson, the jetty is in the foreground, with the curving clouds in the background creating a marvelous pictorial balance. And what more can you say about a traditional depiction of a conceptual object? It’s brilliant.Also great is the diptych “Early Winter Morning: Genesee Park,” in which Charles Deaton’s famous “Sculptured House” is illuminated before dawn in the panel on the left while the one on the right catches the twinkling lights of early morning in Denver.

Don Stinson at Smith is the first solo the artist has had in years, and it’s a majestic offering.

art ltd, Michael Theodore

Artist Profile
Michael Paglia
September/October, 2013

“….For endo/exo, Theodore began with the space itself, which he studied down to the pattern of its rafters and the ventilation equipment. Theodore then constructed the resulting monumental piece–28 feet long, 12 feet tall–along one wall of the gallery. The exterior has an industrial feel, made up of an architectonic grid of dark-colored metal strips, accented by mechanized rods arranged in a regular rhythm that move in response to the viewer’s presence. The open grid allows viewers to clearly see the interior, which is soft and expressive, filled with draped and knotted ropes–”I wanted to do something by hand,” notes Theodore. These ropes are bathed in light in different colors at different times. There is an obvious theatricality to endo/exo, reflecting Theodore’s experiences in performing music. “It’s very theatrical, with the lights coming up, and though I didn’t intend it consciously, I can certainly see the proscenium aspects of it,” Theodore says. Interestingly, in light of Theodore’s music interests, endo/exo does not have a composed sound track, but instead its sounds are made by its moving elements which speed up or slow down depending on whether someone is in front of them or not.

Although Theodore has only been on the state’s art radar for a little over a year, his work, in particular his ambitious installations, have made just about everyone sit up and listen–or, in this case, look.”

Wired, Molly Dilworth

Vision Quest
Clive Thompson
September, 2013

“….For today’s digital artists, the code and algorithms we live in present a similar frontier. They’re our new environment, offering us striking new experiences and abilities. As James Bridle points out, using something as prosaic as the location check-in app Foursquare requires a feat of superhuman sensing—pinging GPS satellites launched into space by the military—that is frankly sort of nuts if you think about it. Yet generally we don’t think about it. So the unifying thread of the new digital artists is to make us notice our technological environment—to enable us to scrutinize the digital furniture of our lives instead of just sinking into it. Aitken blazed the way with video, making our glimmering LCD screens seem uncanny. The new generation of digital artists coming in his wake are going one step further: They’re not just using our daily tools to make art. They’re turning it into a ubiquitous gallery.

Consider Brooklyn artist  Molly Dilworth , who’s done a series she calls Paintings for Satellites. She painted seven huge abstract works on the roofs of buildings in New York and Kansas and then waited for weeks or months until they showed up on Google Earth. When you look at the pictures—most of which are still visible online—you realize with a shock precisely how bionic online maps make us. It’s human vision streaming through satellites. “When we’re on our phones, we’re looking through satellites,” she tells me. Sure, the paintings are lovely and witty. But they’re also disturbing, because the mere act of viewing them makes you feel like you’re spying, which is precisely the point….”

Laura Ball, Juxtapoz
Image courtesy of Juxtapoz Magazine. Photos of Laura Ball by Ingrid Nelson.

For their September issue, Juxtapoz magazine produced a beautiful feature and interview with Laura Ball, which includes images of Ball at work as well as selections from her recent bodies of work.

From the stirring introduction to Ball’s interview, Hannah Stouffer writes:
Ball’s work embodies the dynamism of pure naturalism remaining grounded in the values of reality that we tend to forget. It is heavily laced with botanical elements and an underlying injunction to protect what is real. The environment she has created is that from which we came; it is greater than us, it is all we have, and it has us.

For the full interview with Laura Ball, pick up a copy of Juxtapoz, available at newstands now.

art ltd. magazine

Critic’s Pick
Michael Paglia

July/August, 2013

Regan Rosburg’s exhibition Maelstrom was featured in Art Ltd. magazine as a Critic’s Pick, with critic Michael Paglia noting, “One standout feature of the works is Rosburg’s delicate touch in her drafting, which when combined with the gauzy effects of the resins give the paintings the substantiality of gossamer.”

Denver Art Museum, Laura Ball news
A view of the Frederic C. Hamilton Building, Denver Art Museum. Image courtesy of Studio Daniel Libeskind.

A selection of works by Laura Ball featured in her winter exhibition at the gallery, Minotaur, have been added to the collection of the Denver Art Museum. A gift of the Eleanor and Henry Hitchcock Charitable Foundation, Collection 1, and Zanesville Mandala, were formally added to the museum’s permanent collection.

The Denver Art Museum, founded in 1893, sits in Denver’s Golden Triangle neighborhood, with a building complex of over 350,000 square feet. The museum’s permanent collection comprises more than 70,000 works of art, divided between nine collections.