Laura Ball, Hi Fructose Magazine
Laura Ball’s work was profiled in Hi Fructose magazine in their Spring 2014, Volume 31 issue. Titled, “Capturing the Minotaur: The Art of Laura Ball” Kirsten Anderson interviewed Ball about the conceptual framework supporting her work, as well as the significance of the animals she is currently using as a part of her subject matter.

Anderson writes:
Painter Laura Ball’s hypnotically engaging paintings give the viewer a multi-planed insight to the roiling energy of the subconscious, as well as the dynamics of the equally vital and tempestuous physical world…The spot-on composition and Ball’s ability to render fine details while still retaining loosely winey line work all the images to pulse with an organize vitality.

Luxe Magazine, David B. Smith Gallery
Luxe Magazine listed the gallery in a list of Colorado destinations for “En Route” in their Spring 2014 issue:

Located in the historic LoDo neighborhood of Denver, David B. Smith Gallery has framed itself above the rest. Through progressive contemporary art, the gallery has made a name for itself among collectors on an international scale. Smith takes both established and emerging artists, such as Kim Keever (shown), to exhibit a curated and dynamic palette of talent. With an extensive publishing division and intelligent exhibits, the gallery serves as a cultural compass for the Colorado art scene.

Sarah McKenzie, Transitional, Exhibition CatalogueExhibition catalogue for Sarah McKenzie at the David B. Smith Gallery
March 14 – April 12, 2014

Sarah McKenzie: Transitional
Softcover, 10 x 7 1/4 inches, 86 pages

Foreword: Nora Burnett Abrams, Associate Curator, MCA Denver
Essay: Kyle MacMillan
Additional Text: Kim Dickey

Printed and bound in the United States
Published by David B. Smith Gallery, 2014
978-0-9857418-6-0
$30

To order, please visit our online store.

5280 Home Magazine, David B. Smith Gallery
5280 Home magazine featured the gallery in a feature called “How to Buy Art” in their Spring 2014 issue, which included advice from Denver-based art dealers and consultants.

Research galleries at industry sites such as the Denver Art Dealers Asociation, suggests David Smith, owner and director of the David B. Smith Gallery (pictured). Although the prices aren’t listed online, you’ll get a feel for which galleries’ aesthetics align with yours. Then start visiting your favorites. And don’t get intimidated. Smith says: “This is Denver, and pretty much every gallery here is totally accessible.”

Paul Jacobsen, Orgone, Exhibition CatalogueExhibition catalogue for Paul Jacobsen at the David B. Smith Gallery
March 28 – April 27, 2013

Paul Jacobsen: Orgone
Softcover, 10 x 7 1/4 inches, 64 pages, 28 color images

Essay: Grace Yvette Gemmell

Printed and bound in the United States
Published by David B. Smith Gallery, 2013
978-0-9857418-5-3
$30

To order, please visit our online store.

Cole Sternberg, Exhibition catalogueExhibition catalogue for Cole Sternberg at the David B. Smith Gallery
February 22 – March 23, 2013

Cole Sternberg: all his strength was concentrated in his fists, including the very strength that held him upright
Softcover, 10 x 7 1/4 inches, 62 pages, 44 color images

Essay: Shana Beth Mason

Printed and bound in the United States
Published by David B. Smith Gallery, 2013
978-0-9857418-4-6
$30

To order, please visit our online store.

Don Stinson, The Road to Valentine, Exhibition catalogue
Exhibition catalogue for Don Stinson at the David B. Smith Gallery
October 25 – November 23, 2013

Don Stinson: The Road to Valentine
Softcover, 10 x 7 1/4 inches, 62 pages, 27 color images

Foreword: Jerry Smith, Curator of American and Western Art, Phoenix Art Museum
Essay: Karen E. Brooks, Historian, Department Assistant of the Petrie Institute of Western American Art at the Denver Art Museum

Printed and bound in the United States
Published by David B. Smith Gallery, 2013
978-0-9857418-3-9
$30

To order, please visit our online store.

Don Stinson review, Denver Westword


Michael Paglia
November 7, 2013

Stinson is probably best known for his diptych at the Denver Art Museum titled “The Necessity of Ruins.” Though the piece is not currently on display, it’s familiar to many, since it’s a popular attraction of the Western collection. “Ruins” is a depiction of an abandoned drive-in movie theater; the scene is anchored by a weathered movie screen in one panel and by the natural landscape in the other, and the two paintings have been tied together with a drive-in speaker stand. In this piece, Stinson lays out the key to his chief interest: exploring the way society has intruded on nature.

Most of the paintings in this show were done in the last year or two and are set in Colorado, Utah or New Mexico; nearly all of them include buildings or other structures as significant elements. When I ran into Stinson at the gallery, he remarked that everything was set in the morning — shortly before, during, or immediately after sunrise. He also noted how important it was for him to be part of a longstanding tradition — the landscape — in regional art, saying that it helps to define what’s special about an artist living in this part of the country. It was Stinson who remarked during a panel discussion in 2007 that the Rockies were a celebrity landscape — and he’s right. And it was our scenery that created a nascent art world in this part of the country more than a century ago, even if the landscape is now just one of many approaches being taken by artists around here.

Stinson’s technique in oil on linen seems to come out of the classic realist tradition, with the paint applied smoothly and brushmarks kept to a minimum. Though he’s best known for his depictions of rural ruins, Stinson also does renderings of other artworks. The first of two in this show is a view of the famous “Spiral Jetty,” by Robert Smithson, that juts into the Great Salt Lake. In the Stinson, the jetty is in the foreground, with the curving clouds in the background creating a marvelous pictorial balance. And what more can you say about a traditional depiction of a conceptual object? It’s brilliant.Also great is the diptych “Early Winter Morning: Genesee Park,” in which Charles Deaton’s famous “Sculptured House” is illuminated before dawn in the panel on the left while the one on the right catches the twinkling lights of early morning in Denver.

Don Stinson at Smith is the first solo the artist has had in years, and it’s a majestic offering.