Tag: New York City

Lower East Side Printshop, Hong Seon Jang

Editions ’12
Exhibition Opening and Catalogue Launch
Thursday, May 10, from 6-8 pm | Exhibition on view May 10 – July 8, 2012

With a catalogue essay by Roberta Waddell, a renowned print expert and former Curator of Prints at the New York Public Library, the catalogue and exhibition feature new works created by recipients of the Printshop’s Special Editions and Publishing Residencies: Hong Seon Jang, Jennie C. Jones,  Darina Karpov, David Kramer, and Enoc Perez.

Molly Dilworth Times Square Painting via Goodle Images
Courtesy of Google Images and Molly Dilworth

As featured on Google’s Imagery Update: Week of July 18th:

Cool Water, Hot Island: This five block, 50,000 square foot painting covers the surface of Broadway from 47th to 42nd Streets in Times Square. The concept of Cool Water, Hot Island, references the urban heat-island effect, where cities tend to experience warmer temperatures than rural settings. Cool Water, Hot Island’s striking blues reflect more sunlight and absorbs less heat, thereby making them more calm and comfortable for pedestrians and contrast with the reds and yellows of the neon billboards. The color patterns evoke water and suggest a river flowing through the center of Times Square, an allusion to the original topography of the area, through which a stream known as the Great Kill ran. The project was installed in June 2010 and will remain for 18 months.

Molly Dilworth’s most recent project is Cool Water, Hot Island. This five block, 50,000 square foot painting covers the surface of Broadway from 47th to 42nd Streets in Times Square. The concept of Cool Water, Hot Island, references the urban heat-island effect, where cities tend to experience warmer temperatures than rural settings. Cool Water, Hot Island’s striking blues reflect more sunlight and absorbs less heat, thereby making them more calm and comfortable for pedestrians and contrast with the reds and yellows of the neon billboards. The color patterns evoke water and suggest a river flowing through the center of Times Square, an allusion to the original topography of the area, through which a stream known as the Great Kill ran. The project was installed in June 2010 and will remain for 18 months.