Tag: Westword

The Denver Westword’s arts writer Michael Paglia reviewed Desirable Objects and Cabinet, in which he notes, “At first blush, Desirable Objects has an elegant minimalism; it’s a spare installation with lots of rectilinearity. But when you look closer, you realize that the topic is not formalism, but rather autobiography.”

Read the full review here.

Independent writer Ray Rinaldi analyzes the material and social aspects of Desirable Objects and Cabinet in his article for the Denver Post, referring to Milner as “… the most talented of Denver’s emerging, young artists “.

Read the full article here.

Joel Swanson interviews Adam Milner for One Good Eye:

Read the full interview here.

BEST PLACE TO SEE CUTTING-EDGE ART

“To maintain the lively exhibition schedule at his eponymous gallery, David B. Smith travels the country, checking out cutting-edge artists in New York, Los Angeles, Miami, even Boulder. He’s always looking for new talent for his aesthetically tight exhibitions, and his current offering, Range, is proof of that. New Yorker Penelope Umbrico uses iPhone apps to riff on the history of landscape photography as inspired by the work of the masters of that medium. The resulting digital photos infuse the original black-and-white views of the mountains made with film with colors from computer codes, in the form of shooting stripes or bars in toned-up shades, running right through the scenery. This show is part of the Month of Photography; at other times on the exhibition calendar, you might encounter interactive installations, or paintings that rise a foot off their surfaces, or sculptures that light up, or any number of imaginative takes on contemporary conceptual art.”

Jason Middlebrook’s solo exhibition Drawing Time received reviews from both Westword Magazine’s Michael Paglia and Interview Magazine’s Armchair Traveler.

Michael Paglia’s review “Jason Middlebrook’s Drawing Time Dazzles at David B. Smith,” can be read here.

Also included in Interview Magazine’s weekly Armchair Traveler, Drawing Time was listed as an international ‘must see.’ The exhibition was included alongside three great exhibitions including Claudia Comte at Musée Cantonal Des Beaux-Arts in Lausanne, Switzerland, Frank Stella at Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden, and Tal Streeter at Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, New York. The featured article, Armchair Traveler: Zig Zag, can be found here.


T: The New York Times Style Magazine
Johnny Magdaleno
The Weekly Agenda
August 11, 2014

Brazilian artist Bruno Novelli’s exhibition at David B. Smith Gallery “Materia Radiante” is highlighted in The New York Times | The Weekly Agenda.  Johnny Magdaleno recommends Novelli’s opening reception at the David B. Smith Gallery as a premiere cultural event in the United States stating “The neon hues and rich flora of the artist’s home country find new liveliness against sleek, alien patterns in these fresh acrylic pieces.” The exhibition features new paintings, video and digital animations by Novelli.

5280 Magazine
5280 magazine features Novelli’s “Materia Radiante” as a “best bet” stating, “Bruno Novelli, also known as Bruno 9li, has made a name for himself as an artist in both his home country of Brazil and abroad. His abstract graphic paintings, usually done in ink or acrylic paint, are a window into a frenzied world of geometric shapes and animalistic creatures.”

Denver Westword
“Gallerist David B. Smith says he’s shown work by Brazilian artist Bruno Novelli, aka Bruno 9li (nove is “nine” in Portuguese), in the past, but Materia Radiente, which opens today at Smith’s eponymous gallery, is the artist’s first full solo in Denver. And what a solo it is: Inspired by Novelli’s explorations along the Amazon and in the coastal rainforests near Santa Catarina and São Paulo, the work pops with vibrating colors — even literally, in the case of a series of GIFs that will be screened on televisions in the gallery’s Project Room.” – Susan Froyd

The exhibition also received some wonderful press online and on the radio:
Arrested Motion

Colorado Public Radio

Hi Fructose Magazine

Juxtapoz Magazine

Don Stinson review, Denver Westword


Michael Paglia
November 7, 2013

Stinson is probably best known for his diptych at the Denver Art Museum titled “The Necessity of Ruins.” Though the piece is not currently on display, it’s familiar to many, since it’s a popular attraction of the Western collection. “Ruins” is a depiction of an abandoned drive-in movie theater; the scene is anchored by a weathered movie screen in one panel and by the natural landscape in the other, and the two paintings have been tied together with a drive-in speaker stand. In this piece, Stinson lays out the key to his chief interest: exploring the way society has intruded on nature.

Most of the paintings in this show were done in the last year or two and are set in Colorado, Utah or New Mexico; nearly all of them include buildings or other structures as significant elements. When I ran into Stinson at the gallery, he remarked that everything was set in the morning — shortly before, during, or immediately after sunrise. He also noted how important it was for him to be part of a longstanding tradition — the landscape — in regional art, saying that it helps to define what’s special about an artist living in this part of the country. It was Stinson who remarked during a panel discussion in 2007 that the Rockies were a celebrity landscape — and he’s right. And it was our scenery that created a nascent art world in this part of the country more than a century ago, even if the landscape is now just one of many approaches being taken by artists around here.

Stinson’s technique in oil on linen seems to come out of the classic realist tradition, with the paint applied smoothly and brushmarks kept to a minimum. Though he’s best known for his depictions of rural ruins, Stinson also does renderings of other artworks. The first of two in this show is a view of the famous “Spiral Jetty,” by Robert Smithson, that juts into the Great Salt Lake. In the Stinson, the jetty is in the foreground, with the curving clouds in the background creating a marvelous pictorial balance. And what more can you say about a traditional depiction of a conceptual object? It’s brilliant.Also great is the diptych “Early Winter Morning: Genesee Park,” in which Charles Deaton’s famous “Sculptured House” is illuminated before dawn in the panel on the left while the one on the right catches the twinkling lights of early morning in Denver.

Don Stinson at Smith is the first solo the artist has had in years, and it’s a majestic offering.